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  • The road to the Sesquicentennial: The family feud heats up

    Ladies and gentlemen, when we paused last time along the road to the Brown-Roush Ohio Sesquicentennial Farm owned by my parents, Ken and Judy Roush of Highland County, we were in the late 1880s and a bitter family feud was brewing.
  • The road to the Sesquicentennial: Funerals and feuds
    Ladies and gentlemen, when my great-great-great-grandfather Joshua Brown, the patriarch of the Brown-Roush Ohio Sesquicentennial Farm owned by Ken and Judy Roush of Highland County, passed away in 1867 at the age of 59, it was noted that his eight children were still living at the time of his death.
  • The road to the Sesquicentennial: Brown farmland moves to the next generation
    Ladies and gentlemen, my great-great-great-grandfather Joshua Brown, the patriarch of the Brown-Roush Ohio Sesquicentennial Farm owned by Ken and Judy Roush of Highland County, passed away 152 years ago at the age of 59.
  • The road to the Sesquicentennial: The last will of the patriarch
    Ladies and gentlemen, back in the days when my great-great-great-grandfather Joshua Brown, the patriarch of the Brown-Roush Ohio Sesquicentennial Farm owned by Ken and Judy Roush of Highland County, walked this earth, it wasn’t uncommon for parents to lose children at a young age.
  • The road to the Sesquicentennial: Inskeeps and Browns
    Ladies and gentlemen, my great-great-great-grandfather Joshua Brown, the patriarch of the Brown-Roush Ohio Sesquicentennial Farm owned by Ken and Judy Roush of Highland County, married Jeannette Inskeep 183 years ago.
  • The road to the Sesquicentennial: The Browns arrive in Highland County
    Ladies and gentlemen, Joshua Brown, the patriarch of the Brown-Roush Ohio Sesquicentennial Farm owned by Ken and Judy Roush of Highland County, was born May 6, 1807 and is my great-great-great-grandfather.
  • The road to the Sesquicentennial: Strange land becomes Brown property
    Ladies and gentlemen, on Jan. 31, 1860, Joshua Brown bought 112 acres of land that would be the catalyst that led to the Brown-Roush Farm west of Hillsboro being designated an Ohio Sesquicentennial Farm in 2019.
  • The road to the Sesquicentennial
    Ladies and gentlemen, the year was 1860 – James Buchanan was president of the United States, though Abraham Lincoln won election to the office that year, future Supreme Court Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase started the year as Ohio governor, the United States was on the brink of the Civil War, and old farmer Brown bought 52.853 additional acres of land.
  • The Scott House now
    Ladies and gentlemen, as we wrap up this 175th celebration series of offerings on Scott House mansion and Highland House museum, we look at the uptown landmark built by William Scott since it’s been owned by the Highland County Historical Society.
  • Scott House history, preservation
    Ladies and gentlemen, when Elizabeth Woodbridge Scott died in 1946, the Scott House on West Main Street in Hillsboro was bought at an auction with the intention of turning the property into a car showroom and sales lot, but the Hillsboro school board ended up purchasing the property. The Scott House was home of the Hillsboro library from the late 1940s until the library was relocated to its present location in the early 1970s.
  • The Scott House after the Scotts
    Ladies and gentlemen, for more than a century, the Scott House mansion, which was built 175 years ago, was occupied by Scotts. For review (and there will be a quiz later), the Scott House, the three-story abode on West Main Street currently owned by the Highland County Historical Society, was completed circa 1844 by Hillsboro attorney William Scott.
  • The Scotts of the Scott House
    Ladies and gentlemen, as William Scott reached his 70s in the 1880s, his health began to decline. The attorney who had the historic Scott House in uptown Hillsboro built 175 years ago died in the Scott House mansion about 9 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 13, 1886.
  • Celebrating 175 years of the Scott House
    Ladies and gentlemen, when we chatted last time, the topic of conversation focused on the Highland House, a landmark in Hillsboro that has reached its 175th anniversary this year. Now, let’s get back to the Scott House, also celebrating 175 years in 2019.
  • Celebrating 175 years of the Highland House
    Ladies and gentlemen, when we chatted last time, the topic of conversation focused on two of the landmarks in Hillsboro have reached their 175th anniversary this year – the Scott House and the Highland House. Let’s continue this week with a closer look at the Highland House.
  • Celebrating 175 years on Pioneer Day Aug. 24
    Ladies and gentlemen, two of the landmarks in Hillsboro have reached their 175th anniversary this year – the Scott House and the Highland House. As a last-minute reminder, Highland County Pioneer Day is this Saturday, Aug. 24, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the grounds of the Scott House Mansion at 338 West Main Street in Hillsboro.
  • Jack Hope: A life of aeronautical engineering
    In December 1971, Jack Hope became a full-time consultant to the White House office of Science and Technology under the Nixon presidential administration. In February 1974, General Electric Corporation requested Hope’s return to GE in order to manage the GE portion of a collaborative project between the United States and France, known as the GEISNECMA CFM56.
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