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  • Highland County auction companies of the 1960s: Dannie Hess & Associates

    Ladies and gentlemen, we’ve been tooling around Hillsboro in the ol’ Studebaker hitting local eateries, and I don’t know about you, but I’m kind of full. Don’t worry, I’m sure we’ll get hungry again soon and hit more local 1960s restaurants, but I’d like to drive around and hit a few local auctions and see if we can score a few deals.
  • Remembering the Skyscraper in uptown Hillsboro
    The Skyscraper would often open at 3 or 4 a.m. on certain days of hunting season, and in 1967, the Skyscraper advertised a “fried mush breakfast” for only 55 cents – including coffee. They also sold hunting licenses and ammo. For the first 10 years of the Skyscraper, sandwiches, pie, soup and milk were a nickel. Pancakes were 15 cents, waffles 20 cents with a drink and bacon, eggs, toast and a drink were a quarter.
  • Remembering the Skyscraper in uptown Hillsboro
    The Skyscraper would often open at 3 or 4 a.m. on certain days of hunting season, and in 1967, the Skyscraper advertised a “fried mush breakfast” for only 55 cents – including coffee. They also sold hunting licenses and ammo. For the first 10 years of the Skyscraper, sandwiches, pie, soup and milk were a nickel. Pancakes were 15 cents, waffles 20 cents with a drink and bacon, eggs, toast and a drink were a quarter.
  • The Highlander: Remembering Hillsboro dining in the 1960s
    The Highlander Restaurant dates back to the early 1950s, and construction on the Highlander Bowling Lanes began in the summer of 1959. The restaurant was owned by Harold M. Day, and later by Mae Rosselott Means.
  • The Highlander: Remembering Hillsboro dining in the 1960s
    The Highlander Restaurant dates back to the early 1950s, and construction on the Highlander Bowling Lanes began in the summer of 1959. The restaurant was owned by Harold M. Day, and later by Mae Rosselott Means.
  • Stanforth’s Steak House: Remembering uptown Hillsboro dining in the ’60s
    Let’s stop at Stanforth’s Steak House. Do you remember Stanforth’s or where it was located? If you don’t, you might remember where the former Slow & Low Barbecue was located, or Prime Cut before that on West Main Street or maybe Jon's Cocktail Lounge & Restaurant.
  • Stanforth’s Steak House: Remembering uptown Hillsboro dining in the ’60s
    Let’s stop at Stanforth’s Steak House. Do you remember Stanforth’s or where it was located? If you don’t, you might remember where the former Slow & Low Barbecue was located, or Prime Cut before that on West Main Street or maybe Jon's Cocktail Lounge & Restaurant.
  • Remembering uptown Hillsboro dining in the 1960s
    I don’t know about you, but I’m hungry, so let’s find something to eat. In Hillsboro back in the early 1960s, we have several places to choose from, and none of them are pizza joints. We’ve got A&W Root Beer, Dairy Queen, Dickerson’s Restaurant, Greenroof Restaurant, Highlander Restaurant, Lang’s Smokery, Magee’s Snack Shop, Maroy Restaurant and Stanforth’s Steak House, among others.
  • Remembering uptown Hillsboro dining in the 1960s
    I don’t know about you, but I’m hungry, so let’s find something to eat. In Hillsboro back in the early 1960s, we have several places to choose from, and none of them are pizza joints. We’ve got A&W Root Beer, Dairy Queen, Dickerson’s Restaurant, Greenroof Restaurant, Highlander Restaurant, Lang’s Smokery, Magee’s Snack Shop, Maroy Restaurant and Stanforth’s Steak House, among others.
  • 1942: The $9 billion victory loan drive
    With a week to go, the county had roughly a quarter of a million dollars to raise to meet the quota. Now, that’s a lot of money even today, but remember, $250,000 in 1942 is worth more than $4 million here in good ol’ 2021. Passionate editorials were written, and solicitors scoured the county in an effort to sell bonds to residents.
  • 1942: The $9 billion victory loan drive approaches the finish line
    Ladies and gentlemen, there is about a week to go in the 1942 $9 billion victory loan drive, and Highland County has ponied up more than $600,000 of its $882,000 quota, leaving roughly $250,000 to raise to meet its goal.
  • 1942: The $9 billion victory loan drive
    Ladies and gentlemen, many of us remember the old Hillsboro High School auditorium with fondness. In December of 1942, the auditorium was a relatively new edifice and was packed on a Monday night for a meeting sponsored by the Highland County War Bond Committee. WLW news broadcaster Carroll D. Alcott was the speaker of the evening, and Miss Dorothy McVitty of WLW was the soloist.
  • 1942: $9 billion victory loan drive kicks off
    Ladies and gentlemen, in late 1942, the United States was right at a year removed from the attack on Pearl Harbor which led to the America’s entry into World War II. In a step to help win the war, the U.S. government kicked off a $9 billion victory loan drive, and as we detailed last time, Highland County’s quota was $882,000, which is roughly $13.4 million in today’s dollars.
  • The 1942 victory loan drive
    Ladies and gentlemen, before we visited the mysterious Fallsville Christmas Ghost, we were in 1942 and the citizens in Highland County and beyond were being asked to make financial contributions to help win the war.
  • The Christmas Ghost of Fallsville
    Ladies and gentlemen, before we go back to 1942 and the World War II era, in the spirit of the season, let’s travel more than 150 years back in time to visit the mysterious Fallsville Christmas Ghost. I believe it was our good friend John Levo, who first shared with me this ghost story, which is set in the town of Fallsville, just north of Hillsboro off of Careytown Road.
  • The Christmas/war season of 1942 continues
    Ladies and gentlemen, we’re still in 1942 on account of not taking gas rationing of the time into account … and the way-back machine is a bit thirsty. Don’t worry, folks, we’ll get some gas down the road, but at this point, we may have to walk or hitch a ride.
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