Skip to main content
  • Arthur Milner: A century of service

    Arthur Milner was a legislator, educator, farmer and longtime leader in church, civic and Masonic organizations. As a young man, he helped excavate the area for the then-new Leesburg school building and then participated in the groundbreaking for the present Fairfield school.
  • Greenfield native Dr. Wilfred Konneker: Nuclear medicine pioneer, philanthropist
    McClain High School graduate and local philanthropist Dr. Wilfred Konneker was born Feb. 20, 1922 and grew up in Greenfield, then earned a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree from Ohio University. Along with his wife, Ann, Dr. Konneker is the namesake of the Konneker Education Museum in Greenfield, which is operated by the Greenfield Historical Society.
  • Highland County Historical Society to enshrine four more in Hall of Fame
    Ladies and gentlemen, many years ago the Highland County Historical Society created the Highland County Hall of Fame to recognize, honor and celebrate those who have made invaluable contributions to the county and/or the world beyond. By honoring and recognizing these people, the Hall of Fame serves to stimulate an interest in – and appreciation for – the value of the history of this county and its citizens. Further, the Hall reinforces to our youths that they can, and should, strive for excellence in any endeavor they may undertake.
  • Dr. S.R. Howard and his only son’s tragic train accident in 1920
    Ladies and gentlemen, in our colloquies about the life and times of longtime Hillsboro veterinary surgeon Dr. Samuel Rogers “S.R.” Howard (1861-1933), we discussed last time how his wife, Clara, passed away in 1894 at the age of 28 shortly after giving birth to their son, Joseph, and how Joseph survived World War I, but died in a railroad accident in May of 1920.
  • Dr. S.R. Howard and times of tragedy and sorrow
    Ladies and gentlemen, in our colloquies about the life and times of Hillsboro veterinary surgeon Dr. Samuel Rogers “S.R.” Howard (1861-1933), we’ve talked about how he specialized in horse dentistry, saved some cows who ate dynamite and how the uptown office he leased came tumbling down in 1909.
  • Dr. S.R. Howard and the new ‘Skyscraper’
    Ladies and gentlemen, in last week’s blast from the past, the colloquy was on the time Hillsboro veterinary surgeon Dr. Samuel Rogers “S.R.” Howard saved three cows that had eaten dynamite in 1899. About a decade later, Doc Howard was credited for saving human lives when part of the oldest building in Hillsboro came tumbling down.
  • Dr. S.R. Howard and the cows that ate dynamite
    Well, there you have it, ladies and gentlemen, the cows that ate dynamite – and a crash course on how dynamite tastes and what it can do to humans and bovines.
  • Dr. S.R. Howard, the Hillsboro veterinary surgeon of yesteryear
    Ladies and gentlemen, when I was working at the Highland House Museum a while back, I happened to meet a gentleman whose relative was a veterinary surgeon and dentist here in Hillsboro back in the late 1800s and early 1900s. That afternoon, I learned about Samuel Rogers “S.R.” Howard, who opened a veterinary business in uptown Hillsboro.
  • Freemasonry in Highland County: The storm after the Centennial
    Ladies and gentlemen, in our last confabulation, the topic of conversation was of the Centennial Celebration of Highland Lodge No. 38 of Free and Accepted Masons, which was held Thursday and Friday, Oct. 4-5, 1917, not long after the Temple at the corner of North High Street and Beech Street in uptown Hillsboro had undergone a $30,000 makeover – which would equate to about $700,000 today.
  • Freemasonry in Highland County: Celebrating the Centennial in 1917
    The renovation was completed just in time for the Highland Lodge to hold its Centennial celebration on Thursday and Friday, Oct. 4-5, 1917. Speaking of celebrations, let’s mention one final time that there will be a 200th Reconsecration Ceremony on Saturday, May 4 from 9 a.m. until noon at the Temple. Any Mason who would like to attend the 200th Reconsecration Ceremony by the Grand Lodge of Ohio is welcome to attend. Now, let’s get back to 1917’s Centennial.
  • Freemasonry in Highland County: Renovating the Lodge
    Ladies and gentlemen, in our last confabulation, we spoke of how the Freemasons of Highland Lodge No. 38 erected a Temple in the 1870s that still stands at the corner of North High Street and Beech Street in uptown Hillsboro. However, the venerable edifice doesn’t look quite the same as it did back when it was first built.
  • Freemasonry in Highland County: Building the Lodge
    Ladies and gentlemen, as we examine 200 years of Freemasonry in Highland County, let’s take a look at the venerable Masonic Temple located on the corner of North High Street and Beech Street in uptown Hillsboro.
  • Freemasonry: Surviving the Anti-Masons
    Ladies and gentlemen, in our confabulation last week, we spoke of the first meeting of Highland Lodge No. 38 of Free and Accepted Masons in 1817 and left off with how the Lodge nearly folded due to the great Anti-Masonic agitation that rose up in America less than a decade after the Lodge received its charter 200 years ago.
  • Freemasonry in Highland County: The first meeting
    Ladies and gentlemen, as we mentioned earlier, the first meeting of Highland Lodge No. 38 of Free and Accepted Masons was held in Hillsboro in March of 1817 – March 3 of that year, to be exact.
  • Celebrating 200 years of Freemasonry in Highland County
    The first meeting of Highland Lodge No. 38 was held in Hillsboro on March 3, 1817. Yes, that was more than 200 years ago – the lodge received its dispensation in the 1817, but didn’t receive its charter until 1819, so it was decided at the state level that this year, 2019, would be the year the lodge would celebrate its bicentennial with a Reconsecration Ceremony by the Grand Lodge of Ohio.
  • The beginning of the C.S. Bell Co. in Hillsboro
    Our good friend and Highland County Historical Society founding member Bob Hodson just this week provided me with some more fascinating information about the manufacturing company. Mr. Hodson at one time was a minority partner of the C.S. Bell Co. and shared some background on the company and C.S. Bell himself that I would like to share with you.
Subscribe to Steve Roush