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  • Tigers fall on road at Chillicothe

    It wasn't their best outing of the season, but the McClain Tigers did score a touchdown early in the fourth quarter, but the host Chillicothe Cavaliers eventually defeated the Tigers, 70-7 Friday night at Herrnstein Field.
  • Ghost Stories: Esquires and congressmen

    Two days before Christmas of 1833, nearly 182 years ago, Nelson Barrere was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Hillsboro. Longtime Highland County historian Mrs. Jean Wallis described Nelson Barrere as a “brilliant leader.”

  • Ghost Stories: An old soldier, true patriot and a good man laid to rest

    Ladies and gentlemen, five sons of John Mills and Margaret Morrow Barrere went off to fight in the Civil War. As we’ve discussed, three of their sons never came home and John Mills Barrere, who was in his 60s when America’s bloodiest conflict broke out, lost an arm in the battle of Harpers Ferry in September of 1862.

  • Ghost Stories: Risking life and limb
    Ladies and gentlemen, we’ve discussed how terrible the Civil War was for the family of John Mills and Margaret Barrere. They lost three of their sons, Bebee, William and Thomas Jefferson Barrere, to America’s bloodiest conflict.
  • Ghost Stories: Detention, disease and death
    In days where we can communicate with our loved ones at a moment’s notice, I can only imagine how John and Margaret Barrere felt as their sons languished in prison camps so far away from Highland County.
  • Ghost Stories: Casualties of the Civil War
    In his lifetime, George Washington Barrere saw action in numerous battles – he was presumed to be dead following St. Clair’s Defeat, plus fought in the War of 1812 when he was in his 40s.
  • Ghost Stories: Casualties of the Civil War
    In his lifetime, George Washington Barrere saw action in numerous battles – he was presumed to be dead following St. Clair’s Defeat, plus fought in the War of 1812 when he was in his 40s.
  • Ghost Stories: Casualties of the Civil War
    In his lifetime, George Washington Barrere saw action in numerous battles – he was presumed to be dead following St. Clair’s Defeat, plus fought in the War of 1812 when he was in his 40s.
  • Ghost Stories: Founder and master of the Lodge and a true pioneer passes away
    Several of the Founding Fathers were Freemasons, such as Washington, Benjamin Franklin and James Monroe, among others. Andrew Jackson, Paul Revere, Mark Twain, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Winston Churchill, Theodore and Franklin Roosevelt, Harry Truman, Harry Houdini, Irving Berlin, Henry Ford, Cy Young, Clark Gable, Will Rogers, Gene Autry and John Wayne are also on the list of famous Freemasons.
  • Ghost Stories: A special sword
    As we discussed last time, Nelson Barrere became a lawyer and a U.S. congressman, Thomas Jefferson Barrere operated a store in Maysville, Ky., and Morgan Barrere became a successful businessman and farmer and eventually took over operations of the Barrere Tavern and Inn.
  • Ghost Stories: George Washington Barrere, a man of many hats
    George Washington Barrere and his family left Clinton County in November of 1802 and settled in New Market in Highland County. By my math, that was a little more than 212 years ago.
  • How sweet is victory if success is watered down?
    Sports can be a microcosm of life. I was never the best player by any stretch of the imagination, and I’ve found out in the “real world” that while I’m good at some things, there are folks out there who are better.
  • How sweet is victory if success is watered down?
    Sports can be a microcosm of life. I was never the best player by any stretch of the imagination, and I’ve found out in the “real world” that while I’m good at some things, there are folks out there who are better.
  • Caspar, the famous ghost, Part VI

    It was 9:30 a.m. on July 26, 1845. Just two hours earlier, Lt. Caspar Wever Collins was dressed in his new uniform, smoking a cigar and riding off in a “jaunty and debonair” manner. Now, the 20-year-old Hillsboro native was dead, and Platte Bridge Station commander Major Martin Anderson, who had ordered Collins and 25 men to ride off after Anderson had his morning breakfast, called an officers conference.

  • Caspar, the famous ghost, Part VI

    It was 9:30 a.m. on July 26, 1845. Just two hours earlier, Lt. Caspar Wever Collins was dressed in his new uniform, smoking a cigar and riding off in a “jaunty and debonair” manner. Now, the 20-year-old Hillsboro native was dead, and Platte Bridge Station commander Major Martin Anderson, who had ordered Collins and 25 men to ride off after Anderson had his morning breakfast, called an officers conference.

  • Ghost stories from where I grew up, the conclusion
    As the flames reach toward the sky on that day 83 years ago, let’s close the book on the stories from the place where I grew up. Rest eternal grant unto them, O Lord, and let light perpetual shine upon them. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end.
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