Jeanette Sekan
Jeanette Sekan
By Jeanette Sekan
The Cody (Wyo.) Enterprise
HCP columnist


A few short weeks ago, when life was relatively mundane, I started to pay attention to the upcoming election cycle and posed several questions to myself that I thought might help inform my choices and decisions.

How long ago that time now seems. We are all finding out how quickly life changes. We probably know that somewhere in the recesses of our minds but, like with most things we don’t want to deal with, we put those thoughts aside for another time.

In so many ways, that time is upon us, whether we’re ready for it or not. We all face abrupt changes. When we or someone we love gets ill, dies or something happens to our job or other life situations. One minute we’re rolling along on auto-pilot, the next we’re navigating unchartered waters.

We’re finding that humans really are creatures of habit like most species. We’re also finding out how spoiled and entitled we’ve become. We expect instant gratification, instant answers, instant whatever. Now, a situation we can’t pigeon-hole has us flummoxed and we’re grasping at any and all rhetoric, whether it passes common sense or science muster. Desperation, fear, unsettledness, unknowns are now all around us. It is manifesting itself in some scary ways.

We’re also seeing glimpses of true courage and selflessness.

All of us have questions. Mine continue to mount. Why is there such a fear about toilet paper and other paper products? Why are people fighting in the stores to get their hands on the currently in demand short supply? Why did someone yell and swear at two women who happened to get the last two bags of potatoes? Why did someone take a gallon of milk out of someone else’s cart? Why are a few self-proclaimed supposed pro-life advocates suddenly suggesting the elderly (as yet to be clearly defined by what age falls under that term) should gladly give up their lives for the sake of everyone else’s pocketbook?

Yet, they don’t want a woman or family to make that same decision about whether or not to have a child due to their personal economic or other situation. What changed? Why are some national leaders choosing to pit state against state for life-saving supplies rather than do what a national political and government structure are set up to do? Why are attaboys a prerequisite for needed assistance and aid?

Those who are called to serve all of us, from the first responders to the garbage collectors, grocery clerks and stockers, nurses, doctors, lab technicians, manufacturers of toilet paper and packers of meat and assembly lines that can fruit and vegetables are showing up.

We have many who show up and put themselves in harm’s way for the betterment of society. They are selfless, caring and understand that humans need each other, even when some wish to pit one against another. We aren’t right-left; red-blue; liberal-conservative. We’re human. We’re in an unknown situation where we need each other, even if we shouldn’t touch each other right now. Why do some still need to divide?

Too many questions; too few answers. Maybe some will come soon.