Quinnipiac University
https://poll.qu.edu/

In three high-profile Senate races in the states of Kentucky, South Carolina and Maine, three longtime Republican incumbents are facing competitive races, according to a Quinnipiac University poll of registered voters in each of those states.

"Big political names. Huge political stakes. High anxiety for the GOP. Three GOP Senators who easily won their last reelection bids are looking over their shoulders less than three months from Election Day," said Quinnipiac University Polling Analyst Tim Malloy.

KENTUCKY SENATE RACE

Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell holds a slight lead over Democratic challenger Amy McGrath, 49 - 44 percent, with 5 percent undecided. Republicans go for McConnell 92 - 6 percent, while Democrats go to McGrath 86 - 11 percent. Independents are divided with 46 percent backing McGrath and 40 percent backing McConnell.

Eighty-nine percent of voters who name a candidate say their minds are made up, while 11 percent say they might change their minds.

"Can a former Marine fighter pilot with 89 combat missions win a dogfight with a seasoned political powerhouse who has gone to war D.C. style for decades? She's giving him a run for his money," said Malloy.

Voters give Senator McConnell a slightly negative 43 - 48 percent favorability rating, and they give Amy McGrath a negative 32 - 42 percent favorability rating. Twenty-five percent say they haven't heard enough about McGrath to have an opinion.

As the incumbent Republican, 41 percent of voters say Senator McConnell has the right attitude towards President Trump, 37 percent say he is too supportive of the president, and 13 percent say he isn't supportive enough of him.

SOUTH CAROLINA SENATE RACE


The U.S. Senate race in South Carolina is a tie, with 44 percent of voters backing Republican Senator Lindsey Graham and 44 percent backing Democrat Jaime Harrison. Nine percent say they are undecided. Democrats back Harrison 94 - 3 percent, independents back Harrison 47 - 37 percent, and Republicans back Graham 89 - 5 percent.

Eighty-five percent of voters in South Carolina who name a candidate say their minds are made up, while 13 percent say they might change their minds.

"He has been a firebrand advocate for national defense and a leader of his party for 17 years - but has Lindsey Graham's allegiance to the president put him in jeopardy? The numbers suggest his tenure on the Hill is in trouble," added Malloy.

Voters have a mixed opinion of Senator Graham, with 41 percent saying they have a favorable opinion of him, while 45 percent say they have an unfavorable opinion of Graham. For Jaime Harrison, 38 percent have a favorable opinion, while 24 percent have an unfavorable opinion. Thirty-seven percent say they haven't heard enough about him to form an opinion.

As the incumbent Republican, 40 percent of voters say Senator Graham is too supportive of President Trump, 39 percent say he has the right attitude towards the president, and 10 percent say he is not supportive enough of him.

MAINE SENATE RACE

The U.S. Senate race in Maine is too close to call with Democrat Sara Gideon getting 47 percent of the vote and Senator Susan Collins getting 43 percent. Six percent are undecided. Democrats back Gideon 88 - 7 percent, Republicans back Collins 85 - 8 percent, and independents are divided with 46 percent for Gideon and 42 percent for Collins.

Eighty-eight percent of voters who name a candidate say their minds are made up, while 11 percent say they might change their minds.

"She has both defied President Trump and backed him to the hilt. An embattled Republican in a northeastern state, Senator Collins faces the political challenge of her life," said Malloy.

Voters give Senator Collins a negative 42 - 49 percent favorability rating. Voters give Sara Gideon a slightly positive 40 - 35 percent favorability rating, while 23 percent say they don't know enough about her to form an opinion.

As the incumbent Republican, 48 percent of voters say Senator Collins is too supportive of President Trump, 33 percent say she has the right attitude towards the president, and 12 percent say she is not supportive enough of him.