Ohio Treasurer Robert Sprague has announced Compass Award honorees for the month of April. The monthly recognition program commends organizations, programs and individuals across the state who are working to guide Ohioans toward financial literacy and empowerment.

“Effective financial literacy education goes beyond teaching students about personal finance – it equips them with the skills and know-how necessary to make informed decisions later in life,” said Treasurer Sprague. “Through the Compass Awards, we’re honoring programs across Ohio that are moving the needle and making a genuine impact on our young people.”

Compass Award Honorees for April include:

• Butler Tech (Butler County). By integrating career- and college-readiness efforts into their technical education curriculum, Butler Tech takes a holistic approach to prepare students for the next stage of life. Through interactive career, business, and budgeting simulations, Butler Tech connects the classroom to the “real world,” developing students’ understanding of personal finance and business-related topics. Through its Project LIFE program, Butler Tech is also supporting students living with disabilities by providing instruction on topics such as independent living, communication, employment opportunities and personal finance.
 
• Hudson High School (Summit County). Hudson High School has developed innovative, experiential learning opportunities for students by fostering close partnerships with several community and financial education organizations. With support from the local Kiwanis club, students put their science and business education into practice by selling vegetables grown in the school-run hydroponic greenhouse. Additionally, students with special needs run a campus café where classmates can purchase a range of food and beverage offerings. Through these programs, students develop important career and entrepreneurial skills that will set them up for future success.
 
• Ohio Valley Bank (Gallia County). Through partnerships with local school districts and a deep involvement in their community, Ohio Valley Bank offers several interactive learning programs that teach financial literacy to K-12 students. For elementary-age students, the bank’s Centsables series uses superhero characters to teach basic lessons about savings and credit. Older students participate in the BankIt program, where they receive classroom instruction about personal finance and apply those concepts through in-depth budgeting and life simulations.